Pauls Quiz 160

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1. The man who invented the flying trapaze in 1859 and the name for a brave outfit.

2. What is the name of the international airport in each of the following cities ? (In the case where there is more than one, name the busiest)   
    a. Atlanta  
    b. Sydney  
    c. Rome  
    d. Toronto  
    e. Singapore 
    f. Amsterdam  
    g. Frankfurt

3. China has long kept fairly accurate records of its population. What was the population of China in 2 AD ?   
    a. 900,000  
    b. 9,000,000  
    c. 59,000,000  
    d. 590,000,000

4. A what was installed after a coup d'etat in Chile on the 11th of September 1973 ?  Five letters

5. The names of which two F.A. cup winning teams start with the word Old ?

6. What is the largest lake in each of the following continents ?  
    a. Asia  
    b. North America  
    c. Europe  
    d. Africa

7. Name the three countries in the world with the most internet users.

8. In which two Stanley Kubrick films did Peter Sellers play a role/roles ?

9. In World War II, the USA lost about 59,000 airplanes. Which two countries lost more than 100,000 ?

10. In 2001, which island country in the Indian ocean was number two on the list countries with the most weddings per 1,000 inhabitants and surprise surprise, number one on the list of divorces ?

ANSWERS

1. Leotard A leotard is a skin-tight one-piece garment that covers the torso and body but leaves the legs free. It was made famous by the French acrobatic performer Jules L?otard (1839?1870), about whom the song "The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze" was written.

2. Seven Answers
    a. Hartsfield  
    b. Kingsford Smith  
    c. Fiumicino  
    d. Lester B. Pearson  
    e. Changi  
    f. Schiphol  
    g. Rhein Main (Frankfurt am Main)

3. c. 59,000,000

4. A junta Junta is a Spanish and Portuguese word meaning committee. It is also a Hindi word referring to common people. A military junta is government by a committee of military leaders. It originally referred to an executive body that came to power after a military coup in 20th century Latin America. Often it becomes a military dictatorship, though the terms are not synonymous.

5. Two Answers:
    Old Carthusians Old Carthusians F.C. is an association football club comprised of former pupils of Charterhouse School in Godalming, Waverley, Surrey, England. The club was established in 1876 and won the FA Cup in 1881, as well as the FA Amateur Cup in 1894 and 1897     Old Etonians The Old Etonians Football Club is an English football club whose players are taken from previous attendees of Eton College, in Eton, Berkshire. Founded by Lord Kinnaird in the Victorian era, they were the last amateur or "true blue" club to win the FA Cup on 25th March 1882 when they beat Blackburn Rovers 1-0 at The Oval. They lost 2-1 after extra time to another Blackburn club, Blackburn Olympic, the following year. In all, they reached the final six times in nine years between 1875 and 1883, winning twice. They also supplied a number of players for the England team, including three in one match against Wales in 1879.

6. Four Answers:
    a. Caspian 'sea' 
    b. Superior  
    c. Ladoga  
    d. Victoria

7. Six Answers:
    USA  
    China  
    Japan  

8. Two Answers:
    Lolita   
    Dr. Strangelove Richard Henry Sellers, CBE, commonly known as Peter Sellers (1925 ? 1980) was a British comedian and actor best known for his three roles in Dr. Strangelove, as Inspector Clouseau in The Pink Panther films, and as Clare Quilty in the original 1962 screen version of Lolita.

9. Two Answers:
    Germany 116,000   
    Russia 106,000

10. Maldives The Maldives (or Maldive Islands), officially the Republic of Maldives, is an island nation consisting of a group of atolls in the Indian Ocean. The Maldives are located south of India's Lakshadweep islands, and about seven hundred kilometres (435 mi) south-west of Sri Lanka. The Maldives' twenty-six atolls encompass a territory featuring 1,192 islets, two hundred and fifty islands are inhabited. The name "Maldives" may derive from Maale Dhivehi Raajje ("The Island Kingdom [under the authority of] Mal?").